“Don’t Press Send”

This simple but common phrase has become simultaneous with today’s modern society use of social media. Referring to the old age process of thinking before you act, it now represents a much more broad concept. For instance: a press release, interview, tweet, and yes even recently a proposed law. Any publicly released information is fair game in 2015 and the world will be the judge going forward. This may prove to be an irreversible fatal flaw for the associated parties brand going forward.

Enter the state of Indiana and their proposed law “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” that has been under major scrutiny since its proposition. “A law that would keep the government from forcing business owners against their religious beliefs.” Basically allowing legally sanctioned discrimination to take place. Of course the backlash has been instantaneous and substantial, but it’s the brand of Indiana that takes the biggest hit.

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/indiana-religious-freedom-law-what-you-need-know-n332491

What Are They Saying? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ESPN interviewed NCAA president Mark Emmert saying We, the NCAA have to sit down and say ‘all right, if this environment remains the way it is, what does that mean for us going forward?' We hold lots and lots of events here, we're going to have our national convention here, our offices are here. We have to say, ‘what do we do if this law goes into effect in July, and what's our relationship with the state of Indiana going to be?' 

http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story/_/id/12587768/ncaa-president-mark-emmert-keeping-close-eye-indiana-legislators-new-law-allow-businesses-discriminate-gays-lesbians

The CEO of yelp wrote an open letter to states considering imposing discrimination laws, in it he statesit is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large… Yelp will make every effort to expand its corporate presence only in states that do not have these laws allowing for discrimination on the books.”

http://officialblog.yelp.com/2015/03/an-open-letter-to-states-considering-imposing-discrimination-laws.html

Power Of The Hashtag

Once a foreign keystroke and now a powerful tool that has changed the way we communicate on a daily basis. # or hashtag defines a topic or phrase that is easily grouped in one place for viewing and commenting during the use of social media. When used effectively it can create viral campaigns or messages that have the capacity to reach wide-ranging audiences. In this Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act case several hash tags have been trending over time. #BoycottIndiana, #LGBT, #SB101, and #HB1228 all referring to the Indiana law and the ladder referring to the proposed similar Arkansas law on the table. The twitter community has used these hashtags resourcefully to voice their protest and opinions together. It is undeniable the power hash tags in combination with social media present when used properly.

What It Means?

The brand Indiana represents has fallen from glory. Once renowned for hosting big sporting events, Downtown Indianapolis, their football and basketball programs; is now unanimous with legal discrimination. Powerful affiliates of ownership, corporate America, politics, and celebrities alike are joining the outrage against the law and more importantly the state of Indiana as whole. With them accompanies the immense majority support of the people and consumers, with Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/local/Malloy-to-Bar-State-Travel-to-Indiana-Amid-Religious-Freedom-Law-Backlash-298010911.html) and NY Gov Andrew Cuomo already instituted the banning of state spending on travel to Indiana. In hindsight, it’s probable the Gov. of Indiana wishes he could go back metaphorically and “Don’t Press Send.”

http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/local/Malloy-to-Bar-State-Travel-to-Indiana-Amid-Religious-Freedom-Law-Backlash-298010911.html http://www.cnbc.com/id/102546251

How often do you stop to think before pressing send?